Fallen Facts

  • On average, 150 officers are killed in the line of duty in the United States each year.
  • The average number of years officers served on the force, at their untimely death, is 12 1/2 years. This means that a 25 year veteran has as much chance as a 1 year rookie of being killed.
  • Many officers have also served their country in the armed forces as military police, combat veterans and in other positions.
  • 99% of officers killed in the line of duty leave behind minor children along with their significant other.
  • The spike (higher death number) for officers killed in the line of duty occurs in the months of November, December and January each year.
  • On the day, hour and minute an officer is killed, their paycheck stops. For example, if the officer is killed in August, on the 5th working day of that month, 3 hours and 15 minutes into the shift, eventually, the surviving family will get a paycheck for 4 days, 3 hours and 15 minutes for that month. The check will probably be paid after the end of the pay period, which may be in the beginning of the next month, in this case September.
  • Most often, the surviving spouse has no job or only a part time job and the family depends on the officerʼs income and benefits for survival.
  • Generally, when an officer is killed, the city, parish or county opens up a workers compensation disability case, which is an insurance type claim investigation. This is to determine if the incident qualifies for medical benefits and any workers compensation payout. This action is separate of other insurance claims (if any) the surviving spouse is responsible to make. Workers compensation is a lengthy process.
  • The above claim can also be separate of the disability retirement process, which can take 3-6 months to complete. This means that the surviving family has no monthly income to support their children and pay for bills such as the funeral, mortgage, vehicle, utilities, credit etc…for 3-6 months. The retirement pay may not be the officers full pay but only a fraction of their pay.
  • If there is no spouse, only dependent children, agencies generally offer the disability retirement benefit, divided among the children, until a specified age in their early twenties.
  • Not all Law Enforcement agencies pay for the funeral cost and if they offer a benefit, not all officers have signed up for it. For those who have the funeral benefit, it may range from 1,000 to 10,000 depending on the agency, which will not cover the funeral cost.
  • The shortest time a surviving spouse has reported getting retirement funds is 4 months the longest was 8 months. Insurance and other funds (if any) can take up to a year or more.
  • The surviving family does not get a check during this time period. Many officers are under insured (no life insurance) and do not have future financial savings such as a 401k or Deferred Compensation. Generally officers will think of these benefits later in their career and try to “catch up” before retirement. The family is not left with much for future survival.
  • Fallenʼs main focus is to bridge the gap in income so the family can be secure financially and have one less thing to worry about during this period of devastation.
  • Fallen has no paid members
  • Fallenʼs board is solely comprised of current and retired law enforcement officers.